Community Counselling Centre http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca Helping People Heal Thu, 06 Apr 2017 05:52:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Community Counselling Centre Offers Support for Suicidal Persons http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/counselling-2/suicide-support/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/counselling-2/suicide-support/#respond Fri, 06 May 2016 19:32:08 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=443 A recent Huffington Post article, I Have Mourned 14 Deaths By Suicide, Isn’t That Enough? spells out the sad reality of inadequate support for suicidal persons in Canada today. Alicia Raimundo’s point that accessing services is practically impossible when people are suicidal, really resonates with me. In my professional experience I hear of far too many suicidal persons getting sent away from emergency departments due to lack of resources and improper assessment. When they are admitted, effective treatment is seriously lacking, and upon release, referrals and follow-up rarely occur.

That’s why we at the Community Counselling Centre in Edmonton offer affordable sliding-fee scale long-term counselling. We do not have a waiting list, and we connect with people asap on the phone and in the office. Our therapy approach is non-judgmental, attentive, and informed by the research on suicide. If you or anyone you know is having thoughts of suicide please feel free to call us at 780-482-3711.

Here’s the link to Raimundo’s Huffington Post artice:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/alicia-raimundo/suicide_b_9269000.html

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A recent Huffington Post article, I Have Mourned 14 Deaths By Suicide, Isn’t That Enough? spells out the sad reality of inadequate support for suicidal persons in Canada today. Alicia Raimundo’s point that accessing services is practically impossible when people are suicidal, really resonates with me. In my professional experience I hear of far too many suicidal persons getting sent away from emergency departments due to lack of resources and improper assessment. When they are admitted, effective treatment is seriously lacking, and upon release, referrals and follow-up rarely occur.

That’s why we at the Community Counselling Centre in Edmonton offer affordable sliding-fee scale long-term counselling. We do not have a waiting list, and we connect with people asap on the phone and in the office. Our therapy approach is non-judgmental, attentive, and informed by the research on suicide. If you or anyone you know is having thoughts of suicide please feel free to call us at 780-482-3711.

Here’s the link to Raimundo’s Huffington Post artice:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/alicia-raimundo/suicide_b_9269000.html

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Sexual Exploitation – Dirty Little Secret Launch http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/did-you-know/sexual-exploitation/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/did-you-know/sexual-exploitation/#respond Mon, 28 Oct 2013 22:37:24 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=377 Sexual Exploitation - Dirty Little Secret Launch

Sexual exploitation/sex trafficking is an issue that impacts every community, including Edmonton.

The impact is wide-ranging, affecting safety, health and wellness, and economic prosperity of the community.

But there is hope!

We can stop sexual exploitation/sex trafficking!

This is not an issue that can be solved through a single approach. This is not solely a legislative issue, an issue of poverty, a policing issue, a mental health or an addictions issue.

Sexual exploitation/sex trafficking is a community issue.

There is Hope! We can stop the exploitation if we work together. Stay informed. Sign up to receive key information

Your information will not be used for solicitation purposes. We will keep your contact information on file and send you: information about the issue, updates on what SEWG is doing, and opportunities for involvement in activities.

Go to www.dlsfilm.com

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Sexual Exploitation - Dirty Little Secret Launch

Sexual exploitation/sex trafficking is an issue that impacts every community, including Edmonton.

The impact is wide-ranging, affecting safety, health and wellness, and economic prosperity of the community.

But there is hope!

We can stop sexual exploitation/sex trafficking!

This is not an issue that can be solved through a single approach. This is not solely a legislative issue, an issue of poverty, a policing issue, a mental health or an addictions issue.

Sexual exploitation/sex trafficking is a community issue.

There is Hope! We can stop the exploitation if we work together. Stay informed. Sign up to receive key information

Your information will not be used for solicitation purposes. We will keep your contact information on file and send you: information about the issue, updates on what SEWG is doing, and opportunities for involvement in activities.

Go to www.dlsfilm.com

]]>
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Nietzsche, a novel, and the start of psychotherapy http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/uncategorized/nietzsche-a-novel-and-the-start-of-psychotherapy/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/uncategorized/nietzsche-a-novel-and-the-start-of-psychotherapy/#respond Tue, 13 Aug 2013 21:39:20 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=353 I knew that Nietzsche was a famous existential philosopher who declared, ‘God is Dead’, and affirmed the sanctity of one’s own experience while questioning socially popular “truths”, but I never knew that he wept, much less why. So I was intrigued to learn more when I recently read the fascinating award-winning novel, When Nietzche Wept, by Irvin Yalom.

Author Irvin Yalom, an experienced psychotherapist, blends fact with fiction to tell the 19th century tale of a therapeutic relationship between Nietzsche, and a renowned neurologist Dr. Josef Breuer who confers with a young medical intern, Sigmund Freud.

A superb storyteller, Yalom demonstrates the importance of the task of relational authenticity in psychotherapy and of the individual person’s challenge to “become who you are.” And the descriptions of Nietzsche’s migraines – I could relate!

For me When Nietzche Wept is a compelling novel and I definitely recommend anything by Irvin Yalom; however, I must say I feel some dismay with Yalom’s portrayal of the main female characters as compelling yet demanding, and as beautiful yet manipulative. The novel left me me wondering: whatever happened to the infamous Anna O, the original psychoanalysis patient? I will look into this and get back to you!
To be continued . . .

Susan Anderson…

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I knew that Nietzsche was a famous existential philosopher who declared, ‘God is Dead’, and affirmed the sanctity of one’s own experience while questioning socially popular “truths”, but I never knew that he wept, much less why. So I was intrigued to learn more when I recently read the fascinating award-winning novel, When Nietzche Wept, by Irvin Yalom.

Author Irvin Yalom, an experienced psychotherapist, blends fact with fiction to tell the 19th century tale of a therapeutic relationship between Nietzsche, and a renowned neurologist Dr. Josef Breuer who confers with a young medical intern, Sigmund Freud.

A superb storyteller, Yalom demonstrates the importance of the task of relational authenticity in psychotherapy and of the individual person’s challenge to “become who you are.” And the descriptions of Nietzsche’s migraines – I could relate!

For me When Nietzche Wept is a compelling novel and I definitely recommend anything by Irvin Yalom; however, I must say I feel some dismay with Yalom’s portrayal of the main female characters as compelling yet demanding, and as beautiful yet manipulative. The novel left me me wondering: whatever happened to the infamous Anna O, the original psychoanalysis patient? I will look into this and get back to you!
To be continued . . .

Susan Anderson…

]]>
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Freud and Ambivalence – entry by Susan Anderson http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/counselling-2/freud-and-ambivalence-entry-by-susan-anderson/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/counselling-2/freud-and-ambivalence-entry-by-susan-anderson/#respond Mon, 06 May 2013 21:27:18 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=322 The month of May marks the birthdays of several people in my personal circle, and as well that of Sigmund Freud whose birthday is May 6th. While many of Freud’s claims have been discredited, one of his insights remains a useful one today: ambivalence.

Ambivalence can be defined as the psychological experience of having opposite feelings or emotions simultaneously about someone or something.

We have ambivalence when:

We really want to do something and at the same time we feel afraid to do it.

We feel anger or even hatred towards someone for whom we also feel love.

We want to live and simultaneously, we feel like dying.

Freud helped us to understand that it is a normal human experience to have mixed feelings about something or someone. As we learn to accept and embrace our opposing emotions, we feel less and less distressed or, as Freud would say, feel less neurotic.

At the Community Counselling Centre, we can guide you to understand and work through emotional pain associated with ambivalence.

Please feel free to add your thoughts or experience of ambivalence here on our blog or contact us at communitycounsellingcenter@shaw.ca

or call us at 780-482-3711.…

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The month of May marks the birthdays of several people in my personal circle, and as well that of Sigmund Freud whose birthday is May 6th. While many of Freud’s claims have been discredited, one of his insights remains a useful one today: ambivalence.

Ambivalence can be defined as the psychological experience of having opposite feelings or emotions simultaneously about someone or something.

We have ambivalence when:

We really want to do something and at the same time we feel afraid to do it.

We feel anger or even hatred towards someone for whom we also feel love.

We want to live and simultaneously, we feel like dying.

Freud helped us to understand that it is a normal human experience to have mixed feelings about something or someone. As we learn to accept and embrace our opposing emotions, we feel less and less distressed or, as Freud would say, feel less neurotic.

At the Community Counselling Centre, we can guide you to understand and work through emotional pain associated with ambivalence.

Please feel free to add your thoughts or experience of ambivalence here on our blog or contact us at communitycounsellingcenter@shaw.ca

or call us at 780-482-3711.…

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Quote-of-the-Day http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/uncategorized/quote-of-the-day/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/uncategorized/quote-of-the-day/#respond Wed, 27 Mar 2013 16:23:33 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=307 “There is no way to happiness; happiness is the way.” Paul Tingen…

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“There is no way to happiness; happiness is the way.” Paul Tingen…

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Vitamin D, Depression and Suicide Risk http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/prevention-2/vitamin-d-depression-and-suicide-risk/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/prevention-2/vitamin-d-depression-and-suicide-risk/#respond Wed, 20 Mar 2013 21:53:59 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=287 There are many factors that increase the risk of depression and suicide risk: personal history of trauma, neglect and loss, social and cultural context, genetics, biological conditions and nutrition.

Recent research has focused on the relationship between Vitamin D status and depression and suicide risk. The Vitamin D council website (   http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/  ) comments that

A number of studies report some connection between vitamin D levels and the risk of depression. Low vitamin D levels may be related to depression rather than contributing to the disorder. In addition, an increased risk of depression may be related to several vitamin D–sensitive diseases”.

And

“There is increasing evidence that vitamin D affects all parts of the body, including the brain1. Thus, it is reasonable to think that having higher serum 25(OH)D levels would reduce the risk of depressive disorder”.

Regarding suicide risk there was a very interesting study entitled “Vitamin D: a potential role in reducing suicide risk?”  published in 2011 in the International Journal of Adolescent Medical Health. The abstract reads as follows:

Suicide attempts are know to peak in the spring, overlapping with the time of year when 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels are at their nadir in the northern hemisphere because of negligible skin production of Vitamin D owing to the low levels of ultaviolet B radiation. Low levels of 25(OH)D, the vitamin D metabolite used to diagnose vitamin D deficiency, have been associated with certain pro-suicidal factors such as exacerbation of depression, anxiety, psychosis and certain medical conditions. Therefore, we hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency could also be associated with increased risk of completed suicide. Here, we briefly review the literature on Vitamin D, its deficiency, and its reported association with certain risk factors for suicide.

This growing body of evidence suggests that we should add Vitamin D status to the list of possible factors contributing to the risk of depression and suicide.

John Walker…

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There are many factors that increase the risk of depression and suicide risk: personal history of trauma, neglect and loss, social and cultural context, genetics, biological conditions and nutrition.

Recent research has focused on the relationship between Vitamin D status and depression and suicide risk. The Vitamin D council website (   http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/  ) comments that

A number of studies report some connection between vitamin D levels and the risk of depression. Low vitamin D levels may be related to depression rather than contributing to the disorder. In addition, an increased risk of depression may be related to several vitamin D–sensitive diseases”.

And

“There is increasing evidence that vitamin D affects all parts of the body, including the brain1. Thus, it is reasonable to think that having higher serum 25(OH)D levels would reduce the risk of depressive disorder”.

Regarding suicide risk there was a very interesting study entitled “Vitamin D: a potential role in reducing suicide risk?”  published in 2011 in the International Journal of Adolescent Medical Health. The abstract reads as follows:

Suicide attempts are know to peak in the spring, overlapping with the time of year when 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels are at their nadir in the northern hemisphere because of negligible skin production of Vitamin D owing to the low levels of ultaviolet B radiation. Low levels of 25(OH)D, the vitamin D metabolite used to diagnose vitamin D deficiency, have been associated with certain pro-suicidal factors such as exacerbation of depression, anxiety, psychosis and certain medical conditions. Therefore, we hypothesize that vitamin D deficiency could also be associated with increased risk of completed suicide. Here, we briefly review the literature on Vitamin D, its deficiency, and its reported association with certain risk factors for suicide.

This growing body of evidence suggests that we should add Vitamin D status to the list of possible factors contributing to the risk of depression and suicide.

John Walker…

]]>
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Edmonton Suicide Awareness Week http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/prevention-2/edmonton-suicide-awareness-week/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/prevention-2/edmonton-suicide-awareness-week/#comments Sun, 09 Sep 2012 17:04:04 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=269 This week Edmontonians are invited to gather at City Hall on September 13, 2012 from 4 – 6 PM for the 10th annual Lift the Silence March to honour the memory of hundreds of beloved Albertans, and to raise much-needed awareness around the cause of their tragic deaths: suicide.

Suicide statistics indicate a serious public health issue that calls for much-needed increased public attention.

Most of us know that  2977 people died in the 9-11 terrorist attacks.

But how many of us know:

  • that in 2001, and each year since about 3,700 Canadians die by suicide?
  • that over 400 Albertans die annually by suicide, most under the age of 45?
  • that Worldwide, suicide rates have increased by over 60% over the past 50 years, especially among younger people?

How many us know that suicide is the single greatest cause of violent death, more than car accidents, homicide, and war combined?

Who knew that in the decade since 9/11 the average age of the person who dies by suicide would be getting younger and younger, and that the number of young and middle-aged people who suicide continues to rise?

We need to know now these facts, and we need to respond compassionately from that awareness to help reduce suicide-related suffering. Otherwise, as each week passes, we will continue to lose healthy, talented, and beloved Albertans.

So let’s march forward on this issue. Consider attending the 11th Annual Lifting the Silence Suicide Awareness March this Thursday September 13th at City Hall from 4 – 6 PM.

Let’s march as a community to honour our shared grief over the tragic loss of far too many of its beloved citizens. Let’s move forward in our awareness and our commitment to reduce suicide in Edmonton, in Alberta, across Canada, and around the world!

 

Susan Anderson…

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This week Edmontonians are invited to gather at City Hall on September 13, 2012 from 4 – 6 PM for the 10th annual Lift the Silence March to honour the memory of hundreds of beloved Albertans, and to raise much-needed awareness around the cause of their tragic deaths: suicide.

Suicide statistics indicate a serious public health issue that calls for much-needed increased public attention.

Most of us know that  2977 people died in the 9-11 terrorist attacks.

But how many of us know:

  • that in 2001, and each year since about 3,700 Canadians die by suicide?
  • that over 400 Albertans die annually by suicide, most under the age of 45?
  • that Worldwide, suicide rates have increased by over 60% over the past 50 years, especially among younger people?

How many us know that suicide is the single greatest cause of violent death, more than car accidents, homicide, and war combined?

Who knew that in the decade since 9/11 the average age of the person who dies by suicide would be getting younger and younger, and that the number of young and middle-aged people who suicide continues to rise?

We need to know now these facts, and we need to respond compassionately from that awareness to help reduce suicide-related suffering. Otherwise, as each week passes, we will continue to lose healthy, talented, and beloved Albertans.

So let’s march forward on this issue. Consider attending the 11th Annual Lifting the Silence Suicide Awareness March this Thursday September 13th at City Hall from 4 – 6 PM.

Let’s march as a community to honour our shared grief over the tragic loss of far too many of its beloved citizens. Let’s move forward in our awareness and our commitment to reduce suicide in Edmonton, in Alberta, across Canada, and around the world!

 

Susan Anderson…

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Folk Fest, KD Lang, and Neil Young’s Helpless http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/inspiration/folk-fest-kd-lang-and-neil-youngs-helpless/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/inspiration/folk-fest-kd-lang-and-neil-youngs-helpless/#respond Thu, 09 Aug 2012 21:32:49 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=262 With the Edmonton Folk Fest season upon us, I am recalling kd Lang’s powerful rendition of Neil Young’s iconic song, Helpless. I love that song, the haunting melody, the profound lyrics, that refrain that anthems and honours one of our most painful human emotions: helplessness.

Now I know it’s commonly held view, and one recently portrayed in the newly released documentary, Neil Young Journeys, that the song Helpless is about his childhood years in Omemee, Ontario, but I think that is a mistaken conclusion. Yes, Omemee was where Neil’s formative childhood years occurred, but surely Helpless is much more likely about two other truly northern Ontario towns: Thunder Bay and Blind River.

In 1965, when Neil left hometown Winnipeg at 18, he purposefully chose Fort William (now Thunder Bay) in northern Ontario to expand his horizons musically. Young has acknowledged (Einarson, 1992)  that “Fort William .. had an immense impact on me because I really started to grow once I got away from home. It was my first big step on my own”  and that it was the start of the kind of folk rock that was different from anything he’d done before.

Watching planes take off from the Fort William runway, Neil remarked, “they’re like big birds flying across the sky,” a line he uses in his later writing of Helpless. In Fort William, Young’s band changed their name from the Squires to The High Flying Birds, illustrating the strong impression of that image and metaphor on Young. And significantly, Fort William was where Young first met and hung out with Stephen Stills, an encounter that transformed American rock and roll history. So much of the lyrics of Helpless is about Thunder Bay, where Neil felt the freedom to let his unique style of folk rock truly take flight. His writing “all my changes were there” surely expresses the profound musical transformation he experienced in Thunder Bay, Ontario

The song’s title, Helpless, and its hymn-like lament stems from Young’s time in Blind River, another “town in North Ontario”, where Young’s beloved hearse, Mort, broke down en route from Thunder Bay to Sudbury. Young states that “my whole life was in that car.” and, as we all know, he immortalizes his attachment to that car in another of his iconic hits, Long May You Run. Neil Young waited for several days in Blind River, hoping in vain for a new transmission for the hearse. While stuck there he spent time writing songs, likely reflecting on his recent creative period in Thunder Bay, and expressing the helplessness he felt after days of fruitless waiting for the repair of the vehicle he saw as the means of moving himself and his music forward.

Neil Young’s Helpless shows that even those very talented and successful can feel the pain of helplessness at times. If you would like to share your thoughts about feeling helpless, or about this blog on Neil Young, please feel free to email me at susaneanderson@shaw.ca

 …

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With the Edmonton Folk Fest season upon us, I am recalling kd Lang’s powerful rendition of Neil Young’s iconic song, Helpless. I love that song, the haunting melody, the profound lyrics, that refrain that anthems and honours one of our most painful human emotions: helplessness.

Now I know it’s commonly held view, and one recently portrayed in the newly released documentary, Neil Young Journeys, that the song Helpless is about his childhood years in Omemee, Ontario, but I think that is a mistaken conclusion. Yes, Omemee was where Neil’s formative childhood years occurred, but surely Helpless is much more likely about two other truly northern Ontario towns: Thunder Bay and Blind River.

In 1965, when Neil left hometown Winnipeg at 18, he purposefully chose Fort William (now Thunder Bay) in northern Ontario to expand his horizons musically. Young has acknowledged (Einarson, 1992)  that “Fort William .. had an immense impact on me because I really started to grow once I got away from home. It was my first big step on my own”  and that it was the start of the kind of folk rock that was different from anything he’d done before.

Watching planes take off from the Fort William runway, Neil remarked, “they’re like big birds flying across the sky,” a line he uses in his later writing of Helpless. In Fort William, Young’s band changed their name from the Squires to The High Flying Birds, illustrating the strong impression of that image and metaphor on Young. And significantly, Fort William was where Young first met and hung out with Stephen Stills, an encounter that transformed American rock and roll history. So much of the lyrics of Helpless is about Thunder Bay, where Neil felt the freedom to let his unique style of folk rock truly take flight. His writing “all my changes were there” surely expresses the profound musical transformation he experienced in Thunder Bay, Ontario

The song’s title, Helpless, and its hymn-like lament stems from Young’s time in Blind River, another “town in North Ontario”, where Young’s beloved hearse, Mort, broke down en route from Thunder Bay to Sudbury. Young states that “my whole life was in that car.” and, as we all know, he immortalizes his attachment to that car in another of his iconic hits, Long May You Run. Neil Young waited for several days in Blind River, hoping in vain for a new transmission for the hearse. While stuck there he spent time writing songs, likely reflecting on his recent creative period in Thunder Bay, and expressing the helplessness he felt after days of fruitless waiting for the repair of the vehicle he saw as the means of moving himself and his music forward.

Neil Young’s Helpless shows that even those very talented and successful can feel the pain of helplessness at times. If you would like to share your thoughts about feeling helpless, or about this blog on Neil Young, please feel free to email me at susaneanderson@shaw.ca

 …

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What Is Anxiety? http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/did-you-know/what-is-anxiety/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/did-you-know/what-is-anxiety/#respond Thu, 21 Jun 2012 15:30:18 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=239 Anxiety is that feeling we get of “butterflies in the stomach.”
In its gentler forms, anxiety is a kind of nervousness, like when we performed at a piano recital when we were kids or when we give a speech in public. We can also feel anxious when we’re worried about a project that’s due at work, or we have trouble in our relationships or with our children. When this anxiety becomes troubling, we might begin to lose sleep about it or become easily irritable.

Anxiety is particularly scary, though, when it comes on like an attack. Sometimes these “panic attacks” come as a result of a frightening situation and sometimes they can come “out of the blue,” for no apparent reason. We have no control of it and we might even feel like we’re going to die. 

What does an anxiety attack look like?

  • Racing heartbeat
  • Shallow breathing, lack of breath
  • Upset stomach or headache
  • Sweating palms and armpits
  • Flushed face

What should you do when you’re having a panic attack?

Don’t panic! Just breathe. And remember these points:

    1. People don’t die from panic attacks. Your body won’t let your heart beat faster than it’s able.
    2. Panic is a form of fear that is perfectly natural. It’s the brain/body’s response to a perceived threat in your environment.
    3. All panic attacks are temporary. This will pass.
    4. Supplying oxygen to your brain helps slow down the panic response and also helps you think more clearly, so take a few deep breaths, in through the nose and out through the mouth. Make sure your out-breath lasts longer than your in-breath so that you don’t hyperventilate. You might hold your breath for a second at the top and bottom of each breath.
    5. After a few deep breaths, return to your normal breathing and just pay attention to your breath. This helps you become grounded in the present moment.
    6. Identify five things you can see and say them out loud. Then identify five things you can hear, then five things you can feel. Repeat this with four things you can see, hear and feel; then three, two and one.
    7. Hold on to something: your steering wheel, a stone, a coin in your pocket, or the person next to you (if they’re okay with that!).
    8. Don’t be afraid of what people might think—that only makes you feel more anxious! Remember that most people have had a panic attack at some point; we’re all just too afraid to admit it!
    9. Once the panic attack is over, you may feel exhausted. Take time to rest and treat yourself gently—no beating yourself up about it! Thank your brain/body for alerting you to danger. Reassure yourself that you’re okay.
…]]>
Anxiety is that feeling we get of “butterflies in the stomach.”
In its gentler forms, anxiety is a kind of nervousness, like when we performed at a piano recital when we were kids or when we give a speech in public. We can also feel anxious when we’re worried about a project that’s due at work, or we have trouble in our relationships or with our children. When this anxiety becomes troubling, we might begin to lose sleep about it or become easily irritable.

Anxiety is particularly scary, though, when it comes on like an attack. Sometimes these “panic attacks” come as a result of a frightening situation and sometimes they can come “out of the blue,” for no apparent reason. We have no control of it and we might even feel like we’re going to die. 

What does an anxiety attack look like?

  • Racing heartbeat
  • Shallow breathing, lack of breath
  • Upset stomach or headache
  • Sweating palms and armpits
  • Flushed face

What should you do when you’re having a panic attack?

Don’t panic! Just breathe. And remember these points:

    1. People don’t die from panic attacks. Your body won’t let your heart beat faster than it’s able.
    2. Panic is a form of fear that is perfectly natural. It’s the brain/body’s response to a perceived threat in your environment.
    3. All panic attacks are temporary. This will pass.
    4. Supplying oxygen to your brain helps slow down the panic response and also helps you think more clearly, so take a few deep breaths, in through the nose and out through the mouth. Make sure your out-breath lasts longer than your in-breath so that you don’t hyperventilate. You might hold your breath for a second at the top and bottom of each breath.
    5. After a few deep breaths, return to your normal breathing and just pay attention to your breath. This helps you become grounded in the present moment.
    6. Identify five things you can see and say them out loud. Then identify five things you can hear, then five things you can feel. Repeat this with four things you can see, hear and feel; then three, two and one.
    7. Hold on to something: your steering wheel, a stone, a coin in your pocket, or the person next to you (if they’re okay with that!).
    8. Don’t be afraid of what people might think—that only makes you feel more anxious! Remember that most people have had a panic attack at some point; we’re all just too afraid to admit it!
    9. Once the panic attack is over, you may feel exhausted. Take time to rest and treat yourself gently—no beating yourself up about it! Thank your brain/body for alerting you to danger. Reassure yourself that you’re okay.
…]]>
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Why Counselling? http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/counselling-2/why-counselling/ http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/counselling-2/why-counselling/#respond Mon, 18 Jun 2012 08:00:47 +0000 http://www.communitycounsellingcentre.ca/?p=236 Why do people choose to go “into therapy?”

Because, as human beings, we all need to give voice to the struggles we experience inside of us. Maybe there’s something troubling but you’re too embarrassed to tell your friends. A counsellor is trained to hear your story and to keep your confidence. Maybe you’ve tried telling those close to you what’s bothering you but all they do is give you cheap advice. A good psychotherapist is trained to listen first and then to help you look for you own inner wisdom.

What stops people from going for counselling? Stigma, mostly. Some people seem to think that only “crazy” people need psychotherapy. Maybe that’s true but then again, aren’t we all a bit crazy? Others see the need for counselling as a weakness: obviously you can’t handle things on your own. Is it weakness to ask for help when you need it? I think that’s strength. After all, it takes courage to make the call, schedule an appointment, get to the therapist’s office, and then tell her/him about your situation.

Here’s to courage!

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Why do people choose to go “into therapy?”

Because, as human beings, we all need to give voice to the struggles we experience inside of us. Maybe there’s something troubling but you’re too embarrassed to tell your friends. A counsellor is trained to hear your story and to keep your confidence. Maybe you’ve tried telling those close to you what’s bothering you but all they do is give you cheap advice. A good psychotherapist is trained to listen first and then to help you look for you own inner wisdom.

What stops people from going for counselling? Stigma, mostly. Some people seem to think that only “crazy” people need psychotherapy. Maybe that’s true but then again, aren’t we all a bit crazy? Others see the need for counselling as a weakness: obviously you can’t handle things on your own. Is it weakness to ask for help when you need it? I think that’s strength. After all, it takes courage to make the call, schedule an appointment, get to the therapist’s office, and then tell her/him about your situation.

Here’s to courage!

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